• Elegant Figures by the lake at Wiganthorpe Hall, Yorkshire -
    Price on request

    Signed lower centre: F. Nicholson 1793

    Pen and black and ink and watercolour over pencil

    30 by 42 cm., 11 3/4 by 16 1/2 inches

     

    Wiganthorpe Hall stood just north of Terrington, seven miles west of Malton, North Yorkshire, in the Howardian Hills. The house originally dated back to the twelfth century. The Metham family lived there during the reign of Elizabeth I and Francis Metham undertook extensive rebuilding of the house in 1595. By the mid eighteenth century, it was in the possession of the Garforth family and in 1780 they commissioned the York architect John Carr (1723-1807) to add a new hall to the Jacobean one. Most of the house was destroyed in the 1950s but some of the parkland and its features, including a lake, survive.

  • Cayton Mill near Scarborough, Yorkshire -
    Price on request

    Signed and inscribed on the original mount: F. Nicholson 1793 and inscribed by the artist on the back of the original mount: F. Nicholson Knaresborough Yorkshire/or at No 58 Cornhill London and further: Miss Erskine with Mr Carr’s Compts/Leeds 29 October 1793

    Pen and black and ink and watercolour over pencil

    23.5 by 32.8 cm., 9 1/4 by 13 inches

     

    Provenance:

    Mr Carr, a Merchant, Leeds;

    Given by him to Miss Erskine, 1793;

    With Agnew’s 2004;

    Private Collection, UK, until 2011

     

    Exhibited:

    Ryedale Folk Museum, Hutton-le-Hole, Francis Nicholson, March-May 2012

     

    Cayton is a village on the coast four miles south of Scarborough. The mill at Cayton was still recorded in the 1850s but has long since disappeared.

  • The Head of Windermere, Cumberland -
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    Watercolour over pencil

    39 by 56.5cm., 15 ?  by 22 ? inches

     

    This is a view of the North end of Windermere taken from the road north of Low Wood with Brathay Hall visible on the far shore. Brathay belonged to the Braithwaite family and was a farmhouse before being sold in 1788 to George Law who enlarged the farmhouse and it became known as Brathay Hall. In 1799 it was sold on to Charles Lloyd and from May 1804 the house was rented by the amateur artist John Harden. The Langdale Pikes are visible in the clouds behind the Hall.

     

    Provenance:

    With Frost and Reed, 1945

     

  • Hackfall Wood near Ripon, Yorkshire -
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    watercolour over pencil heightened with scratching out
    28.7 by 41.2cm., 11 1/4 by 16 inches
  • Kirkstall Abbey from across the river Aire, Yorkshire -
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    Watercolour over pencil

    30.0 by 42.0 cm., 11 ? by 16 ? inches

     

    Nicholson was born in Pickering, Yorkshire and lived in various Yorkshire towns before moving to London in 1803. He painted mainly views of Yorkshire and Scotland and, later in life, London. He built up such a successful career as a drawing master in London that he stopped exhibiting from 1833. Nicholson was one of the founding members of the Old Watercolour Society and this may be the view of Kirkstall Abbey he exhibited there in 1805, no.108, or his Royal Academy exhibit of the subject in 1803, no.434.

     

    Kirkstall Abbey stands on the river Aire about three miles north-west of the centre of Leeds. Another view of Kirkstall Abbey by Nicholson was engraved by J. Walker and published in 1799.

  • View of Westminster Bridge and the Thames -
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    Pen and black and ink and watercolour over pencil

    30.7 by 43.1 cm., 12 by 17 inches

     

    Provenance:

    J. & W. Vokins, London;

    A Deceased Estate

     

    This is a view of Old Westminster Bridge over the Thames, taken from Lambeth with the gatehouse of Lambeth Palace just in view on the right.  The bridge was constructed between 1739 and 1750.  The jumble of buildings that made up Westminster Palace can be seen alongside Westminster Hall, with St Margaret?s and Westminster Abbey behind, with the spire of St Martin?s in the Fields visible on the far side of the bridge.

     

    Nicholson was born in Pickering, Yorkshire and lived in various Yorkshire towns before moving to London in 1803. His subject matter tends to be of Northern England and Scotland and his London views are rarer. He built up such a successful career as a drawing master in London that he stopped exhibiting from 1833. This is an example of his `stained drawing? style and is likely to date from the 1790s.

     

    An exhibition of his work continues at the Ryedale Folk Museum, Hutton le Hole, Yorkshire until 20th May 2012 and there is an accompanying catalogue, Francis Nicholson (1753-1844), Painter, Printmaker and Drawing Master by Gordon Bell, Colin Coulson and Judy Dixon. We are grateful to Professor Gordon Bell for his help in cataloguing this watercolour.

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